Governor’s Mansion Deals With Flooded Basement and Ruined Furniture

illinoisAccording to the Pantagraph, Gov. Pat Quinn, of Illinois, has been experiencing major issues with his mansion. A week ago, the roof began leaking, and as many are aware, a leaky roof often predicates thousands of dollars worth of roof repairs. After a major rainstorm that hit just after the roof started leaking, the 1855-era home then developed a flooding basement.

The home, located in downtown Springfield, was one of many basements that experienced flooding this past week. According to David Blanchette, one of the governor’s spokesmen, much of the furniture stored in the basement was effectively ruined, and a company would be hired to clean everything out. When water is allowed to soak into furniture of any sort, it often has the effect of causing wood to rot, and mold to form in couches and chairs. Luckily, none of the furniture was reported to be historic in nature.

“They are lucky there was nothing of considerable value in the basement, in my experiences this is rarely the case,” says Andrew, Owner of Aqua Tech Waterproofing. “Many people use their basement for storage and have a number of valuables stored there. I have seen many memories and cherished belongings ruined by basement flooding.”

Blanchette did not indicate whether the basement’s flooding had been caused simply by the flood, or by a larger issue with Gov. Quinn’s basement. “This was not the only basement in Springfield to get wet this week,” he was quoted as saying. The roof continues to be a problem for the mansion; several weeks ago, furniture had to be removed from the third floor in order to prevent it from being damaged by leaking water.

Many are saying that the dilapidated nature of the home is a sign of the state’s “crumbling finances.” The issues associated with the mansion have come to the attention of state lawmakers. The leaks are a concern considering that the mansion is listed as the third oldest in the U.S. “This is a serious issue we’re looking at,” said state Rep. Rich Brauer, who further indicates that the state has approximately $3.7 million it could use to refurbish the mansion and fix its structural issues.

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