Six-Year-Old Firefighter’s Daughter Called a Hero After Saving Her Family From a House Fire

firefighterdaughterAlthough she wasn’t the fire expert in her home, a six-year-old girl from Swampscott, MA, alerted her family to a potentially fatal blaze, saving their lives.

A firefighter’s daughter is being praised for alerting her family to the quickly spreading fire that ended up completely destroying their large home at 670 Humphrey Street.

The girl awoke when the fan in her bedroom shut down, and she went to wake up her mother. They spotted an orange glow from the kitchen, and the mother, Lori Pierro, ran upstairs to wake the rest of the family.

The girl’s father, Anthony Pierro, is a firefighter, so it’s not surprising that the family had a fire evacuation plan in place. All five family members made it safely outside and went to a neighbor’s house, where they called 911.

“Probably with just no more than a minute to spare they got out,” Swampscott Fire Chief Kevin Breen said.

The three-alarm fire took a little more than an hour to extinguish, and drew firefighters from Swampscott, Marblehead, Peabody, and Lynn. The fire was first reported around 5 a.m., and while firefighters were able to get it under control in a timely manner, much of the home had already been destroyed.

As thick smoke filled the neighborhood, firefighters evacuated nearby homes. Fortunately the damage was limited to the Pierro home, a garage, and a vehicle.

Anthony Pierro has been with the department for several years. A fund is being set up for the family through Lynn Firemen’s Credit Union in Lynn.

“With catastrophic fire losses like this, most do not realize the damages go beyond the house and the structure of the building,” says David Miller, Owner, Miller Public Adjusters, LLC. “The loss of family heirlooms, handmade irreplaceable personal items, childhood memories, to name a few, can make a fire loss like this hard to imagine.”

The fire, likely an electrical fire, is believed to have started in the garage, spread to a vehicle in the driveway, and then spread to the house itself.

“We’re all safe. That’s the most important thing. Things can be replaced but your family can’t. And we are all safe,” Lori Pierro said.

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